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Let's Talk Garden Tillers




Here are are a few thoughts about garden tillers. You landed on this page for a reason. You're not just looking for any garden tiller; you want the best garden tiller! I am going to tell you about the success I have had with my garden tillers. I watched all the videos and read the reviews, I am stuck on Mantis and Troy Bilt, just from hands-on experience


Choose from one of the categories below, and start the path to finding the best rototiller for your needs.
Here are are a few thoughts about garden tillers. You landed on this page for a reason. You're not just looking for any garden tiller; you want the best garden tiller! I am going to tell you about the success I have had with my garden tillers. I watched all the videos and read the reviews, I am stuck on Mantis and Troy Bilt, just from hands-on experience


Choose from one of the categories below, and start the path to finding the best rototiller for your needs.


Cultivators

CultivatorSometimes referred to as "mini-tillers," cultivators are light-weight, portable lawn tools. These are the perfect tool for weeding gardens and cleaning between established beds. They are Great! I am on my second one. First, the two-cycle Mantis tiller up-graded to the four-cycle last year. I used the two cycle for eight years. Very dependable, started having carburetor problems, so I went to the four-cycle what a great machine.

Cultivators are either electric or gas-powered. They are propelled by the cutting tines, which rip through dirt and soil. If you've got a small garden, then a cultivator will do the trick.


Garden Tillers

Garden Tillers have potent engines designed to break new ground.

Garden tillers come in three different styles: front-tine, mid-tine or rear-tines.


Front-tine tillers are typically cheaper and designed for weeding or stirring established beds. I do not prefer this type anymore. They tend to beat the hell out of you. When I was younger, I could use these man handler, type tillers. Thanks to rear tine tillers. Tilling is a whole lot easier. The hardest part for me is turning it around. My back has been fuse L-4 and L-5. to remedy this I place 1/4" plywood on the ends of my 25' X 50' garden. Real easy to turn, less resistance than sod.


If you want to break new ground, you'll need a rear-tine tiller - preferably with counter-rotating or dual-rotating tines to break up hard soil or clay. I have a 1965 Troy Built tiller. I saw this tiller in an old garden bed alongside the road. It had been abandoned and left for dead. So we stopped and asked the owner if I could buy it. The owner said you could have it! The motor was seized up as I expected lack of oil would kill the machine fast.
Cultivators this is the 2-cyle model
This is the 4-cycle model

Cultivator Sometimes referred to as "mini-tillers," cultivators are light-weight, portable lawn tools. These are the perfect tool for weeding gardens and cleaning between established beds. They are Great! I am on my second one. First, the two-cycle Mantis tiller upgraded to the four-cycle
last year. I used the two cycle for eight years. Very dependable, started having carburetor problems, so I went to the four-cycle what a great machine.
Cultivators are either electric or gas-powered. They are propelled by the cutting tines, which rip through dirt and soil. If you've got a small garden, then a cultivator will do the trick.


Garden Tillers
Garden Tillers have potent engines designed to break new ground.
Garden tillers come in three different styles: front-tine, mid-tine or rear-tines.


Front-tine tillers are typically cheaper and designed for weeding or stirring established beds. I do not prefer this type anymore. They tend to beat the hell out of you. When I was younger, I could use these man handler, type tillers. Thanks to rear tine tillers. Tilling is a whole lot easier. The hardest part for me is turning it around. My back has been fuse L-4 and L-5. to remedy this I place 1/4" plywood on the ends of my 25' X 50' garden. Real easy to turn, less resistance than sod.


If you want to break new ground, you'll need a rear-tine tiller - preferably with counter-rotating or dual-rotating tines to break up hard soil or clay. I have a 1965 Troy Bilt tiller. I saw this tiller in an old garden bed alongside the road. It had been abandoned and left for dead. So we stopped and asked the owner if I could buy it. The owner said you could have it! The motor was seized up as I expected lack of oil would kill the machine fast.


Here is how I found it, It had a 8 horse motor at that time.
Pretty good shape for sitting in raspberry bushes for several years.
After the motor update, a Briggs and Stratton 12 horse.

I have been using this tiller for 8 years now. One pull start saves on the back. These units are real time savers, I use the Mantis for hilling potatoes, mixing potting soil, grinding compost, and weeding. If it wasn't for these tools I could not garden as well as I can. I will list more garden tillers on my website as time goes by. Go online and check out what is available. I am sure you will find one to suit your needs. Have fun Gardening! 5/25/18

What Are You Feeding The Deer This Summer?

What Are You Feeding The Deer This Summer

How many of you feed deer? I feed deer primarily in the winter to help them get through Wisconsin's harsh winters; we also like to watch them. How many of you feed deer? I feed deer primarily in the winter to help them get through Wisconsin's harsh winters; we also like to watch them.
Fall the pests that can raise holy hell on your landscape; few are as destructive as deer. Whether they are alone or in small herds, they can wipe out entire vegetable gardens, flower gardens, trees, and shrubs, and they virtually do it overnight. Even folks who are plagued by deer admit to a curious love/hate relationship with them. After all, they're a beautiful sight to behold while you sit on the deck with a cocktail and watch the sun go down. We enjoy watching the deer. I have had as many as seven deer in at a time. In the rut, it is exhilarating.
Hungry deer will eat almost anything—including the foods listed on our "won't eat" list. It partly depends on what else is available and how hungry the deer are. Deer in different regions have different palates. And the deer in your backyard might not be the only one in the neighborhood that enjoys gobbling morning glories.
What Deer LikeDeer often go for tender greens of lettuce, pansy, ivy, hosta, and most young plants. Spring and early-summer plants, including tulips, lilies, and roses, seem especially delectable to deer. They feast on fruits of all kinds, from strawberries to fruit trees and fallen fruit. Deer will eat bark, twigs, and leaves of most trees and shrubs. They damage woody plants, particularly during winter, when food is scarce.
Deer will do anything and everything to get their hands (or hooves) on your flowers and vegetables. Keep deer from eating their way through your garden with these solutions.
Build a Deer FenceThe ideal deer fence should be at least 10 and preferably 12 feet tall, and the cross pieces, whether wire or wood, should be spaced eight inches apart. If they are any more comprehensive, the deer can squeeze through them. It's also an excellent idea to electrify the fence. Even better is a fence that slants outward at a 45-degree angle and rises to a height of 4 feet. You see, it's the depth of the fence rather than the height that keeps the deer from jumping over it. Some people may not be able to afford these types of barriers, or it's possible that they may be in violation of local ordinances.
For minor deer problems, wrap the trunks of trees with 4-foot-high galvanized hardware cloth or chicken wire, or use either material to encircle plants prone to attack.
The best-known deer repellent is ordinary bar soap. Hung from strings in trees or large shrubs, whether wrapped or unwrapped, the scent of the soap is said to keep deer away. Some people even attach soap bars to stakes, placed at 10- to 15-foot intervals along the perimeter of their property or garden area.
Another favorite repellent is human hair, the smell of which is also said to send deer scurrying elsewhere. Just ask a barber or hairdresser to collect a bag full of hair, and then stuff a handful of it into the leg of an old pantyhose and hang it in your trees and shrubs or scatter it about your garden beds as if it were mulch.
How about rotten eggs as a means of repelling deer? Some commercial deer repellents contain what's called putrescent whole egg solids, which is a solution containing rotten eggs. Whether you use the store-bought or mix up your own, the stench is just as offensive to deer as it is to people. To make your own, mix five whole eggs in five quarts of water, add that to a sprayer of some kind, and drench your plants. Here is a recipe I use, and it does work!
Homemade Deer Repellent
Tree eggs
Three tbls. of red hot sauce
Three tbls. of garlic juice or minced
Add enough water to a blender to process and mix well. Add this to a gallon of water and spray on plants. You have to do this after every time it rains. The only drawback.

I can't wait to get my hands on one of these! I checked them out on amazon.com the "Scare Crow" looks like the buyers choice. Watch the video they are funny. Motion-activated sprinklers are a real game-changer when it comes to deterring deer from specific garden areas, but not all of them are created equal. When they sense motion, these sprinklers deliver a sharp burst of water in the direction of the movement, scaring the wits out of the deer and sending them running. The range of the sprinkler’s aim can be easily adjusted to target a reasonably particular area, making them ideal for protecting vegetable gardens and individual shrub or flower beds. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4feEceifGMU the only disappointing thing is. It is not solar, and I suggest buying rechargeable batteries, save some dough. I hope this article gives you some ideas how to combat Deer. It is always a challenge. Who doesn't like a good challenge? 5/14/2018 Resources for the article are

1. https://www.hgtv.com/design/outdoor-design/landscaping-and-hardscaping/deter-deer-in-the-garden. 2. https://savvygardening.com/deer-proof-gardens/ 3. https://www.deerrepellentpacks.com/homemade-deer-repellent-solutions

10 Steps To Growing Productive Vegetables






10 Steps to Growing a Productive Vegetable Garden.  Few gardening endeavors are as enjoyable or rewarding as growing your vegetables. The pure pleasure of strolling through your garden as you harvest tomatoes, beans, cucumbers and the like for that day’s meal is only heightened by the knowledge that you’re experiencing the freshest, most flavorful and nutritious produce nature can create.

1. Choose varieties that grow well in your zone. Not all vegetable varieties grow well in all areas. Ask your local nursery or cooperative extension office which varieties are best for where you live. There may be varieties that resist diseases specific to your area, or that produce better crops under your climate conditions. https://www.ufseeds.com/learning/planting-schedules/wisconsin-vegetable-planting-calendar/

2. Plant at the right time of year. Seed packets generally state the proper time to plant. In some areas planting windows are very narrow, and you must hit them reasonably precisely for a bountiful harvest. In other areas, you can plant several times over the summer and maintain a more extended harvest season. Your local nursery or cooperative extension office is the best source for local planting dates.

3. Prepare the soil adequately before planting. Work in generous amounts of organic matter such as compost or composted manure. If you don’t use composted manure, which already contains nitrogen, also work in a complete fertilizer.

4. Plant properly. Sow seed at the proper depth and space, follow the directions on the package. Vegetables planted too close will produce poorly, as to overcrowding. If you are transplanting, make sure not to plant too deep, the stems could rot, use a hand towel to dig the hole just deep enough to bury the root ball. Make sore it is level with the surface.


5. Water consistently. Maintain even soil moisture, so plants do not dry out, but don’t over-water. Water deeply, then give the soil time to dry partially before watering again. Inconsistent watering will reduce yields in most vegetables, and make others – like cucumbers and lettuce – taste bitter. Installing a drip irrigation system connected to an automatic timer is your best bet. Soaker hoses work well also, less water on the leaves.

6. Fertilize regularly. Maintaining vigorous growth is very important with almost all vegetables. Most should be fed with a nitrogen fertilizer at least every 4 to 6 weeks. However, be careful not to over-fertilize, which can cause some vegetables, especially tomatoes, to produce less.

7. Mulch.  2- to 3-inch layer of organic matter applied over the roots of your vegetable plants will cool the soil, reduce weeds, and help prevent soil moisture fluctuations that ruin quality. It is handy to have a compost pile or a composter. If you do not have compost pile start today. Utilize all you waste.

8. Eliminate weeds. Weeds compete with vegetables for water, nutrients, and sunlight, thus reducing yields. Pull weeds by hand and cultivate the soil frequently to keep them to a minimum. Weeds do help hold water I just cut the flowers to prevent more seeds.

9. Harvest often. Many vegetables, especially beans, squash, peppers, and cucumbers, will stop producing if not harvested frequently. I Pick every day in July and August. If you can’t eat all you gather, vacuum pack and freeze or start canning. August and September we will be canning weekly.


10. Control of insect pests. Check your plants daily. Many insects enjoy fresh vegetables as much as you do. Always keep an eye open for insect damage, and protect your plants with a solution labeled for use on vegetables. Do organic search recipes, for pest control. There is no reason to use nasty chemicals. Think about what you are putting in your mouth. I hope these tips will help with a successful growing season. 5/10/2018


Why Buy More Potting Soil? Rejuvenate Last Years

Can this topic honestly can be confusing? I will take a culmination of a few I read and add something I do. Your container veggie garden did fabulous last year, and you are jazzed up to start the season healthy.  You wonder, should I throw out my old soil and start with new?  I’d recommend to re-vitalize it! After you have allowed your plant to grow in its potting soil for a year or two, I try to do this every year; you may want to rejuvenate the soil. This will add back nutrients that have been depleted over the years. This is a great way to recycle the soil you already have. Of course, if any of the plants that you were growing were infected with insects or any disease, you will have to get rid of the potting soil to avoid
contaminating any new plants.

Put on a pair of garden gloves and remove any plants from your potting soil.

Lay a tarp outside and dump the contents of your flower pots in the middle of the tarp. Run your hands through the old potting soil and remove any plant roots, pieces of plant or stones. Crush up any soil clumps.

Weigh or eyeball how much old potting soil you have. Figure out what half of that is and add that much compost to the pile. You will end up with a ratio of 2:1 (old potting soil to compost). The compost will add new nutrients to your old soil. https://www.gardenguides.com/124481-rejuvenate-potting-soil.html I have saved coffee grounds and eggshells all winter long so I add 10% off these ingredients to the pile.

Homemade Organic Fertilizer Recipe
To make your own balanced all natural fertilizer:

1/3 cup of green sand (potash and minerals)
1/3 cup of rock phosphate or bone meal (phosphorous and minerals)
1/3 cup of alfalfa or soybean meal (nitrogen)
1 tbsp Azomite (70 minerals and trace elements)

Add 25 percent of either peat moss or perlite to your old soil. This will keep your old potting soil draining well. https://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/revitalize-your-potting-soil-with-compost-and-homemade-fertilizer-zbcz1403

Use a shovel to mix the ingredients. Once they are combined, you can begin refilling your flower pots. This recipe has everything covered.  I am so ready to make some potting soil! It has been six months since the weather has been 50* A very long winter for us in Northern Wisconsin. Any way you choose to mix your soil will definitely improve the depleted nutrition, your plants will thrive again this Summer. Best of luck and Happy Gardening! 2/25/2018 I am going to try this. http://theplantguide.net/2017/09/24/7-things-put-tomato-planting-hole-best-tomatoes/ It all makes sense to me.

We Have You Covered With These Garden Watering Tools


Maintaining green lawns, lush flowerbeds, or productive vegetable gardens usually means homeowners need to give Mother Nature a little boost. Proper watering tools including watering cans, hoses, sprinklers, and related accessories can make managing water levels a lot easier. Be sure to buy the right tool for the job: That 25-foot hose may seem like a bargain until it can’t reach those farthest garden rows, and a tiny indoor watering can. Will not have the capacity for all those outdoor planters. When buying a garden hose, do not buy the cheap ones. Garden hoses are a necessity to all gardeners. Hoses are in the watering tool category and, as with any job, it is essential to select the proper watering tool for the job. Using Hoses in the Garden There are also specific uses for specific garden hoses. Sprinkler hoses are capped at one end and water is then forced out of little holes along the gardening hose. Sprinkler hoses are often used for watering lawns or new planting beds. Soaker hoses are made from a porous material that allows water too slowly seep into the root zones of newly planted beds. The primary purpose of flat garden hoses is secure storage. http://www.gardentoolscorner.com/Watering-Equipment-s/258.htm

1.  Our 50 ft. Garden Hose Vinyl, 5 Ply garden products reflects designs that are current or en vogue. It doesn't necessarily reference historical design styles and often provides a feeling of everything in its place. They are named for its high quality, durability, stability and withstanding capacity for generations. We offer unique, creative and innovative, inspiring designs, luxurious look texture for all kind of space and variety of selections for shopping.

2.  Our Hi-Rise Spike Sprinkler products
Reflects this Hi-Rise Spike sprinkler is fantastic! It took about 10 seconds to adjust the water pressure to the amount we needed for our size garden, and we were done. This waters from the very center of the sprinkler out to all sides. There are some top holes in the arms and a top slot in the very center. This is the one. I would HIGHLY, HIGHLY recommend this sprinkler for a home garden.... some of the best money I ever spent! If you have large areas of water? Try this sprinkler out. http://www.gardentoolscorner.com/Hi-Rise-Spike-Sprinkler-p/hi-rise-sprinkler-us-orgl11163.htm

3.  100 ft. Xpanding Hose - Green If you have not tried one of these hoses you are missing out. We use ours on the deck for easy watering. It is not like the traditional hose, it has a green coat, which makes itself looks more beautiful and attractive. It's made of Natural latex tube & Dacron, which is Environmental and Non Toxic. The amazing expandable hose. Turn on the water and watch this mini hose grow to a maximum length full-size hose! Super light and easy to handle. When you turn off the water to the Pocket Hose, it shrinks back to its original size. Perfect for gardens, terraces, patios, windows and more, you turn on the water and watch the Hose grow and grow and grow! Car Washing, Watering Flowers / Vegetables, Washing Windows/Walls/Floor/Fish Tank, garden, RV, pool, boat, etc. Indoor use is a breeze, excellent for filling the hot tub too. 

4.  • Perfect For The Homeowner and Ideal For General Purpose Spraying, Gardening Applications, and Pest Control, Durable 24 Inch Poly Wand, and Shut-Off Valve Assembly
45 Inch Pvc Hose, and Easy-To-Fill Funnel Top
Large Pump Handle With A Built-In Wand Retainer, and Pressure Relief Valve Plastic Adjustable and Flat Nozzles. I use this tool a lot of pest and fungus control.  https://www.homedepot.com/p/SOLO-0-33-Gal-Handheld-General-Sprayer-403/205184731

5.   Tough Cleaning Sharp Stream, Rinsing Full Flow and Cone Spray Put Quality In The Palm Of Your Hand, Heavy Duty, Full Size, Die Cast Zinc Body, Brass Valve Stem, Stainless Steel Spring, Heavy Duty, Full Size, Hold Open Clip For Continuous Spraying, Self Adjusting Duck Packing For Lifetime Leak Proof Seal. Simple design a little vegetable oil on the rubber o-ring from time to time to keep it lubricated and soft, front and back.


7.  If you're looking for a serious sprinkler you can still count on several years from now, try this pulsating sprinkler from the Melnor Heritage line. It is built of durable, non-corrosive, all-metal parts and is guaranteed by Melnor for as long as seven years. The base is constructed of durable zinc, heavily coated, and sealed in Green enamel. This model covers a maximum radius of 42.5 feet or 5,600 square feet in a circular shape. The sprinkler adjusts to water anywhere between 20 degrees to a full 360 degrees. You can lower the stream to cut spray radius down for smaller watering jobs. With this capacity and versatility, you should be able to cover most yard sizes and shapes in just a couple of passes. If you've got a large yard and plan on keeping it green for a long time to come, this sprinkler is worth considering. It is backed by a 7-year limited warranty. https://tiendamia.com/producto?amz=B00004SDYT

8.  Get to the root of your garden and flower beds with the Miracle-Gro Soaker Hose. Create a customized irrigation system with this easy cut-n-connect hose that allows you to control and customize the watering of your garden, vegetables, and flower beds.
This innovative system delivers moisture straight to the roots, where the water is needed most. This soaker hose system is made of 65% recycled materials and uses up to 70% less water than standard hoses. https://couponcravings.com/miracle-gro-50-ft-premium-soaker-hose-5-00/

I hope I have given you some insight into gardening water tools. you have to spend a little more for peace of mind. This is not an area to skimp, you will benefit in the long run. I too have learned the hard way by being thrifty. Pay a little more to get years of dependability, it is worth it $$$$. I am going to discuss watering cans next. Spring is trying to make it's presence in the North woods of Wisconsin, still below freezing at night it will be a while yet. I usually plant after Memorial day, because of the frost factor. Happy Gardening to all! 4/25/2018

Which Garden Hand Hoe Is Right For You? Let's Explain: Part 2

Garden Hand Hoe: Part 2

I researched a little deeper this week. Always in search of good tools to make gardening much more pleasant and less stressful, if there is such a thing? I am happy eight days, and vegetable plants are sprouting. All hoes have the same basic structure and purpose: a long handle with a paddle, blade, or stirrup at the end, typically at an angle to the handle. As I have found not all hoes are created equal. The uses for hoes are to cultivate the garden soil and to remove weeds. Even with this basic design, there are a few variations, and using hoes in the garden successfully means choosing the right one: for your needs, Paddle, or Draw, hoe. The basic gardening hand hoe goes by many names, including paddle, draw, chopping. These are excellent general hoe that can help you dislodge weeds by the root or mound and shape soil. You can find versions of this with smaller paddles for tight spaces and in lighter weights. If you aren’t sure how to use a hoe that is more specialized, this is an excellent place to start. Read more about Gardening Know How: Different Garden Hoes – Learn How To Use A Hoe For Gardening https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/tools/different-garden-hoes.htm. Stirrup hoe. While the paddle hoe is usually used by pulling it back or making a chopping motion, you can use the stirrup with a back-and-forth motion that helps to dig out stubborn weeds without displacing a lot of soil. I like the paddle hoe, must be modified to a slim blade easier to slide through the soil no chopping for me.  The paddle or blade on this type of hoe is long and thin. This hoe is designed to weed in narrow spaces, and the blade rides parallel to the surface of the soil. Because of the angle of the blade, you can use it without bending over, which is excellent for the back. I have found five more hoes to explore; I will let you check them out and see what you think? 

1. Weed Shredder
The weed shredder the tool with teeth. Back and forth motion shreds weeds. Made of tempered spring steel. Two different sizes the long one measures 54-inch handle and the short measures 13 inch handle the blades on both measures 5 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches. Made in the USA

2. Japanese Ika Hoe
The Japanese Ika Hoe is a personal favorite for weeding around perennials including small fruit trees, shrubs, and medicinal herbs.   It is also well suited to prepping an area (weeding, working in compost, etc.) that is too small to allow a full-length tool.
It also makes quick transplant holes for veggie starts or bulbs.
The flat blade is suitable for scraping off weeds just below the surface, while the three prongs excel when you want to remove roots as well.   Small bunch grasses can be popped out like a lever.
   Fully forged from a single piece of steel, there are no welds to break.  The wedge left protruding can be tapped in incrementally if the head begins to get loose.  This one is very sturdy and an excellent value for the price.

3. Heavy Duty Garden Hoe
This is our original Rogue Hoe design, and we're still proud of it. The head is 7" wide and sharp on three sides for working in tighter areas. This hoe has a heavier head and heftier handle (1 3/8") than the other garden hoes. For those who want to move more dirt -- it's an excellent choice. It's a favorite for men but used by many ladies as well. I found these doing my research, I am going to get one the perfect hoe, just how I would use a hoe, sharp with pointed corners for getting in tight areas. http://www.prohoe.com/garden_hoes.html

An heirloom hand-forged garden tool from Korea with a specially designed 7" steel blade. The curvature of the pointed blade allows the soil to be thrown to the side like a plow which makes it easier to dig holes and trenches. The edges of the blade are used to level, mound, loosen soil, and cover seeds. Wood handle. 60" overall. 

5. Pull Hoe (6 inches) by Sneeboer
A customer favorite, this garden pull hoe by Sneeboer has a traditional hoe shape and is a tried and true weed killer. The sharp edge of this garden hoe has a unique angle allowing it to slice right through weeds and leave the surface clean. The stainless steel blade is strong enough for hardest of soils. This pull hoe is hand-forged from stainless steel and fitted with a long, back saving, Ash hardwood handle from FSC Certified forests. Very well-crafted hoe, I would love to have this in my tool collection. I found more, enough for a 3rd article but that enough, for now, you get it. I look forward to seeing weeds again. This turned into a very interesting topic. If there is such a thing this hoe is sexy! 4/5/2018

A Gardener's Haven: Ideas For Neatly Storing Your Garden Tools In the Garage




If you're a gardener, then you probably enjoy time outside creating a beautiful garden that you can be proud of. After all, tasty fruits, vegetables, and herbs, fragrant and beautiful flowers and foliage, and verdant greenery are some of the hallmarks of a successful garden that many people can enjoy. But if you want to have such a successful garden, then you also need the tools to plant and maintain it. You want your supplies and tools to be organized, easy to find, and you want them to be maintained so as to avoid rust and other damage. If you are a gardener who needs help creating the perfect storage and organization system for your garden tools, read on for a few tips.





A Garden Tool Utility Sink

Say goodbye to dirty, rusty tools by utilizing a sink. Keeping your garden tools clean is part of keeping gardening tools organized and maintained, so if you have the space, consider adding a sink in your garage. You will be able to wash the dirt off of all of your tools quickly and efficiently.







Wire Bins
Garden storage doesn't need to be a chore when you have the right type of bins. Plastic-coated wires is a great option because you can easily see what is in each of your bins. They also make an annual clean-up a snap because they wash off easily and dry quickly.








Magnetic Storage

For both shed and garage storage, a magnetic strip is an ideal way to store small, sharp tools, such as pruning shears. Not only will your tools be more organized, but they will also be less of a hazard for you or anyone else who uses that space.



Tool Hanger

Who wants to be constantly picking up hoes, rakes, and shovels that topple over every time someone closes the garage door? A tool hanger will ensure that long-handled items are always neatly organized on the walls, and you'll feel better knowing that no one will trip over them.




Image Credit: Immaculate Garage

Storage Shelves

If you're like a lot of gardeners, your storage shed might be just a corner of your garage. To optimize you space for your garden tools, install the large shelves, but don't shy away from also using smaller shelving for spaces that are more cramped. Seed packets and small tools, such as a trowel, are often best stored in smaller spaces so they don't get lost among your larger items. Get stacking bins for small tools and hooks for larger ones. 


When your garden supply area is neatly organized, you will have more time to spend in your garden. That means that there will be more fragrant flowers, fruits, and vegetables to enjoy. And you'll also have more time to spend with friends and family who can enjoy them with you.


Let's Talk Garden Tillers

__ GardenToolsCorner.com Here are are a few thoughts about garden tillers. You landed on this page for a reason. You're not jus...